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Photo Story: Did you miss Afropunk this year?

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

Every year, Atlanta welcomes the “Carnival of Consciousness” that is AfroPunk. Afropunk not only redefines punk, every year expanding their community of rockers, but it creates space for important conversations around African-American people, their struggles and their triumphs. With a full schedule, there was never a dull moment at this year’s 2018 Afropunk Fest.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

Attendees of the festival saw new and emerging artists of color as well as well-known performers, all while dancing, embracing inclusivity, celebrating themselves and stunting their best outfits.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

AN ASSORTMENT OF MUSIC
Afropunk featured a variety of artists performing on multiple stages throughout the venue, an old factory converted into an artist hub. This year’s lineup included artists such as The Internet, Scarlxrd, Noname, Pusha T and Death Grips.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

Pushing stereotypes and boundaries, the range of acts was diverse. Proving again that punk isn’t always what people think, performances featured influences in rap, screamo, smooth R&B, electro and funk, among others.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

RESCHEDULED ACTS
Artist Rico Nasty was set to perform on Saturday, Oct. 13, but when she did not show for her set, her fans seemed visibly disappointed. They began to chant her name and demand for Rico to come on stage.

Rico Nasty did, however, appear in the Sunday lineup, but it threw off the schedule of other performers and caused confusion amongst the audience.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

A CELEBRATION OF ART
Afropunk is not only a portrayal of music but a celebration of art. Festival-goers arrived in their best and most intricate ensambles, showing off their individuality and all the different ways to be punk. From the simple to the extreme, these attendees went all out to pose for the camera and social media.

Photos by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

CONSUMABLES AND COLLECTIBLES
With a delicious food selection, ranging from Jamaican to seafood and some soul food, there was always something new to try. If you wanted something more simple like chicken and waffles or a hot dog, Afropunk had that, too.

Photos by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

The festival also provided space to connect with local entrepreneurs and browse through fashion and beauty products on display.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

ACTIVISM
Collective conversations in the Activism Row, the Afropunk Global Initiative and an Atlanta exclusive, “Solution Sessions” centered around getting informed about civic participation. They also discussed how the youth could be making a difference in the community, dismantling bias in the media, exploring mass incarceration and breaking down negative stigmas tied to black women in America.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

With 2018 being Afropunk’s third year in Atlanta, we hope 2019 will be just as electric.

Photo by Unique Rodriguez | The Signal

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