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Learn to speed read: Free speed reading classes for Georgia State students

 

Students are assigned extensive reading material from multiple teachers weekly that some don’t bother to read. Those that do tend to have a hard time not only reading, but retaining all of that information.

 

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Paul Nowak is the founder and program director for Iris Reading, a training company that helps not only students, but companies and organizations, learn how to speed read.

Speed Reading is a technique that improves one’s ability to read information quickly. Iris Reading instructor, Tom Whittington, explains on the company websites, why students should learn to speed read.

“People take these courses, because they have too much to read,” Whittington said. “They just want to find ways to get through it faster, be able to retain more of what they read so that they can perform better on tests and presentations, and just so they can read what they want to read.”

 

Nowak is offering workshops on Oct. 22 through Oct. 24 that will focus on three main topics: How to boost your reading speed, improving your comprehension and remembering more of what you read.

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The classes will be online webinars that are pre-recorded and emailed to the students 24 hours before the workshop begins.

 

Iris Reading teaches students not only how to speed read, but also memory productivity techniques and increased focus in order to be more efficient and skilled speed readers.

In a video sample of one of his classes, Nowak goes over three bad habits you need to change: fixation, regression, and auditory reassurance.

Fixation is when your eyes stop and go on every word that you read. When you first learn how to read, you go word by word to break the word down, and the notion continues to stick today.

Regression is when you go back to reread things. Nowak stated that statistically everyone does this about 33 percent of the time.

The last habit, auditory reassurance, is when you say words in your head. You reassure youself that you know something by saying it.

Iris Reading has worked with companies such as Google, Disney, CNN, and Allstate and also top universities around the country like Harvard, Columbia University and Georgia Washington University.

 

Emails have been sent to students about these workshops that include the registration link but if students haven’t received the email the link to register is http://www.irisreading.com/gsu/.